Eavesdropping


A conversation in the back of my car between my ten year old daughter and her shcool friend regarding their proposed school council. My daughter is child A and her friend is child B. The other names are false. Went something like this….

Child B: “Yes but Niamh is telling everyone that if they vote for her she will have homework cancelled.”

Child A: “Well I will tell everyone that if they don’t get homework they won’t pass exams and then won’t get the best jobs.”

(Short interruption to carry out the compulsory “yellow car/bumper-dumper” in-car ritual).

Child A: “She said she is going to have a anti-bullying workshop and anyone who is bullied can go to it and be safe there but she is a bully herself. She bosses everyone.”

Child B: “Yeah, she is too bossy. She tells people who they can play with and who they can’t. And she told Katie that if she didn’t vote for her she wouldn’t be allowed to join her recess gang.”

Child A: “I know. I think she’s a bit lonely.”

Child B: “She tried to stop me from playing with Amber today but I did anyway.”

Child A: “I am going to tell people that if they vote for me I will have an outdoor play centre built with proper climbing stuff and swings. I’ll start lot’s of clubs too and I’m going to make a school magazine and everyone can write letters about what they’ve done and we can have a problem page and fashion page and we can put all the school news in it.”

Child B: “Yeah! Great! And we could have a competition to find the best name for it.”

(Short silence).

Child B: “I’m going to vote for you.”

Ah bless. Who do you think would make the best politician?

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6 responses to this post.

  1. Posted by Supersimm on May 5, 2006 at 8:16 am

    Sounds like there are two future politicians begining to bloom. “Girl Power” in the making!

    Reply

  2. Yes, but the “pushy” one who used emotional force to entice her friend to vote for her would probably thrive in the world of politics. Lol.

    Reply

  3. Posted by Supersimm on May 6, 2006 at 12:10 pm

    Yes I agree. I believe all good politicians learn at an early age what can be used as a tool to further their own ends. Should we nurture this? If we nurture this does it encourage corruption at later stages and if we don’t will it stifle future leader’s abilities?

    Reply

  4. Good points. I think the pushy ones go far just because they are pushy, with or without any kind of nurturing.  Of course, without the right guidance they may well go far but in the wrong direction.

    Cynical though I am these days towards politicians, I still believe that most of them start out with the genuine self-belief that they can make changes for the better but it seems sadly inevitable that they all too often end up playing the game with the rest – "fit in or die" sort of thing.

    Reply

  5. Posted by Supersimm on May 7, 2006 at 9:34 am

    Unfortunately I have to disagree on this point. I feel that your cynicism may not go far enough. I fear that the positions of power are temptations to a particular mindset. This is then further corrupted when that power is gained. I however do not deny that there are genuine people in politics that want to do the right thing. I also feel some will be corrupted one way or the other and some won’t. Possibly my cynicism goes too far.
    But Hey!
    We all have our beliefs right or wrong.

    Reply

  6. Actually, I probably agree with you more than you realise. You’re spot on to say that particular mindsets are drawn towards positions of power but I do believe that many radical youngsters, fresh out of uni…minds buzzing with all sorts of ideological beliefs, do have a genuine desire to “change the world”…an honest and healthy interest in politics and social issues. So they fall into the political world. The rest of the course is all too often, predictable and recurring for a great many of them, ie, as you said..corruption and sleaze take priority over their “vision”. Who knows, maybe in some cases they just become so dissillusioned by the whole game…if you can’t beat ’em… and all that.

    But yes, I’d say there are a great many more who go into it for the “power” factor than those who have genuine ethical visions to try to change things..

    Reply

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